No Time to Die

Episode 60 – No Time to Die

The fifty eighth episode of Columbo was titled No Time to Die and was the second episode of the show’s eleventh season. A family wedding becomes a manhunt as the bride goes missing. In this podcast Gerry and Iain look at a major departure from Columbo‘s usual format.

 

 

It is a day (and night) of celebration as Columbo’s orphan nephew, Detective Andy Parma (Thomas Calabro) of the LAPD, marries Melissa Hays (Joanna Going), daughter of the wealthy Sheldon Hays (Donald Moffat) and Louise Hays (Patricia Huston). Andy’s joy turns to anguish, however, as his bride disappears shortly after they retire to the bridal suite.

 

As Columbo, Parma and a group of colleagues including Sergeant Goodman (Dan Butler) and Detective Dennis Mulrooney (Doug Savant) attempt to piece together the night’s events, Melissa is being held captive by a crazed stalker, Rudy Strassa (Daniel McDonald), who intends to force her to participate in a bizarre wedding ritual before re-enacting his father’s murder of his mother and subsequent suicide.

 

With support from their Captain (Lance LeGault), Columbo’s crack squad move quickly to investigate and eliminate Albert Wagner (Don Swayze) on a tip off from Tubby Comfort (Cliff Emmich). Meanwhile photographer Alex Varrick (Daniel Davis) and Bailey (David Byrd), who cleans a nearby restaurant at night, provide vital clues to propel the lieutenant in the right direction.

 

Alan J. Levi followed up his directorial work on Uneasy Lies the Crown and Columbo and the Murder of a Rock Star with this, his third and final stint behind the show’s camera. The episode was adapted from a story by Ed McBain – a pen-name of Evan Hunter – and the teleplay was written by Robert Van Scoyk, who previously wrote Murder Under Glass and had an uncredited hand in the script for Death Hits the Jackpot.

 

If you have thoughts on any aspect of No Time to Die, please share them below, or find us on Twitter at @columbopodcast.

 

The Columbo Podcast is widely available – on iTunes, Stitcher, tunein, Pocket Casts or pretty much wherever you choose to receive and manage your podcasts. If you enjoy the show it would be greatly appreciated if you consider leaving ratings and reviews on these sites – particularly iTunes – as that can make a big difference to growing the podcast’s audience.

 

No Time to Die was released in 1992. It is 98 minutes long and originally aired on the ABC network. This episode is not available on Netflix, but can be found on the Season 10 or complete collection DVD box sets from Universal (all remaining episodes are considered ‘Season 10’ in the DVD collection).

 

The Columbo Podcast Team

The Columbo Podcast Team

The Columbo Podcast team develops, produces and promotes The Columbo Podcast.

  • Largo

    Oh no! We’ve finally reached that non-Columbo, Columbo ABC Mystery Movie! Now, this one is most definitely NOT Columbo. I know this type of response has been directed at some of the earlier ABC revival episodes by others, but for me this particular “Columbo” movie fits that bill to a ‘T’ like no other, eh! Whenever I’ve encountered these aforementioned criticisms directed at the ABC Columbo revival series, I’m always shaking my head and saying to myself, ‘Compared to what!?!’ I’m thinking along this line because I’m always painfully aware of the two CINO (Columbo In Name Only) episodes that the Columbo producers unleashed upon the unsuspecting television viewing public on the ABC Television Network in 1992 and 1994, respectively.

    No Time To Die is the first of the two CINO episodes (the other is Undercover) that were adapted from stories by Ed McBain. I have nothing against Ed McBain, but what were Peter Falk and the other Columbo producers even thinking here? For me, it appears that they were thinking along the lines of “let’s really shake things up …. and piss off almost all of the Columbo fans!” But all they ended up doing was presenting all of us Columbo fans with a by-the-numbers, psycho on the loose police procedural melodrama. In short, total and complete crap! I don’t really like to recount this, but this was the only ABC revival episode that I got to watch with my mother — along with a grumbling and very disapproving (in retrospect, I don’t blame him at all) Papa Largo. I know, I know: ’tis a most pitiful situation to admit to, but, alas, ’tis a true one, eh. :.(

    No Time To Die — why in the Sam Hill did they pick this for the title? It doesn’t really make much sense beyond the painfully obvious: “Golly gee whiz, getting killed at your wedding or on your honeymoon sure would be a bad scene, man!” Well, no shite, Sherlock! How about choosing a far more appropriate title for this debacle from such selections as: Columbo and the Vanishing Niece-In-Law, or The Bride Who Wasn’t There, or perhaps Honeymoon Interrupted. Oh, shoot — let’s just bring out the heavy artillery and get mean by going with Columbo Becomes Mannix!, because I feel that all of this is just one big, dumb detective episode instead of actual Columbo fare.

    As I mentioned in the previous discussion thread, the only good thing that I can say about No Time To Die is that it features the very lovely Joanna Going. I was first enchanted with Joanna’s beauty when I saw the Dark Shadows revival series on NBC that aired back in the early part of 1991. Joanna Going portrayed Victoria Winters and she was most excellent in this role. Below you’ll find a short clip from this Dark Shadows mini-series, where Barnabas (Ben Cross) gets twitterpated by Victoria after she dons a 19th century nightgown that was originally worn by Josette Collins — Barnabas’ lost love. Be seeing you!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnCCNhDDUFU

    • You’ll hear in the podcast that we were split on this. One of us tends to agree with you!!

      • Largo

        Wait …. what? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! ????????

        Both of you gents don’t agree with me that this is a CINO episode!??! Inconceivable! ????

        This isn’t a case of Columbo going off the rails like “Last Salute To The Commodore” — it’s one in which we have a very non-Columbo episode to deal with here. I like the fact that we get to see Columbo at his nephew’s wedding and cutting a rug with his niece-in-law and all — but couldn’t this have been a framing device for an actual Columbo Mystery Movie instead of this mediocre Ed McBain adaptation with our Lieutenant hero clumsily grafted onto it? Well, this is just how I feel about this “No Time To Die” debacle. I’m crestfallen about what you said here about your podcast for this week. I so wanted to hear Gerry say that this one is a “turd” — along with Iain stating unequivocally that this episode is “terrible.” Oh, the humanity! ????

      • Largo

        Well, after listening to this week’s podcast, I’m afraid that I’m going to have to hand out demerits to you both for your respective responses to this No Time To Die debacle. Gentlemen: this is most definitely a sub-par Columbo episode. It baffles me as to how you can ridicule this episode while pointing out its various absurdities and then come away with your respective “par” and “above par” ratings. The mind boggles! ?

        For me (and I dare say more than a few others), this mediocre television film ranks as just typical Hollywood dross when ignoring the Columbo factor entirely. But taken strictly as an episode of the Columbo Mystery Movie series, No Time To Die is just completely forgettable crap — in my not so humble opinion. However, maybe it does have a slight edge over Murder In Malibu, but that’s not saying too much, eh.

        Overall, I enjoyed your discussion and I had some nice belly laughs while listening to your humorous asides and witty observations. But Iain’s blunt retort during Gerry’s ‘Gotcha!’ summation — “a bullet to the face” — made me laugh so loud that I scared my kitty cat! So things can’t be all that bad since you provided me with some hearty guffaws this evening. Yeah, I strongly disagree with your final critiques on this episode, but I still love both of you gents and I’d gladly share a few pints with you — anytime and anywhere. Be seeing you! ?

        • Afraid I was shocked at the par and above par ratings, myself, here. I have certainly enjoyed seeing Columbo out of his element in the past, but this goes quite a way past that, in sticking Columbo into something so far from the Columbo formula it just has no chance of working for me. Even if they’d removed Columbo from the story and replaced him with Fat Ollie Weeks, I think I’d have channel surfed right past this one back in 1992. Found a blog post where somebody reviewed both the McBain book and this Columbo episode, though. Kind of fun:

          https://bloodymurder.wordpress.com/2014/04/15/so-long-as-you-both-shall-live-1976-by-ed-mcbain/

          • Largo

            That was a very entertaining read, Salty. Thanks for sharing that link!

          • Great link!

        • Thanks Largo. I think we’ve covered in the past that we’re always very generous on our par/above par grading system!

          • Largo

            Well, yeah — mostly. The exceptions tend to be some of my favorite episodes, however …. now why is that, eh? FYI, it’s “Paranoid Friday” here where I’m working and …. so …. uhmm — never mind …. nothing to see here, eh! 😉

    • Ian Baxter

      Totally agree Largo, you wouldn’t do this to another programme with such a defining, celebrated and recognisable formula, so why do this to Columbo and disappoint the fans? Like your alternative titles.

      • Largo

        Thanks, Ian! Yeah, it’s like Peter Falk and the other producers were drunk with power or something at this particular time and felt they could do anything here. Perhaps these men thought it was a good idea to dispense with the Columbo formula while saying to heck with the fans — only to go forth at full throttle into total mediocrity with a blasted Ed McBain story that had absolutely nothing to do with Columbo! EEGAH!!!

        I remember sitting there watching this travesty along with my parents and thinking to myself: “What have they done to my favorite detective show!?!” It’s a crying shame that this No Time To Die thing was aired instead of Death Hits The Jackpot while I was in town visiting my folks. I’m positive that both of parents would have really enjoyed Death Hits The Jackpot. ‘Tis a pity!

    • Joanna Going is lovely, to be sure, but my heart still belongs to Alexandra Moltke….

      • Largo

        I totally agree with you, Salty! I absolutely adored both Alexandra Isles Moltke (Victoria Winters) and Kathryn Leigh Scott (Maggie Evans) on the original Dark Shadows series. When Alexandra left the show in 1968, my interest in this series waned considerably — Dark Shadows was never the same without our true Victoria Winters!

        • I bought the entire run of Dark Shadows several years ago on DVD. My wife and I naively thought we would watch the series all the way through. Years later and we’re only somewhere in the upper 500s on the episode count.

          Someday we’ll get there….

  • Largo

    Hey, everybody — it’s “Squirrel Appreciation Day” over here in the USA! So let’s all get real squirrelly and agree that No Time To Die is the best Columbo Mystery Movie ever! 😉

    • CarlosMu

      Enjoy the holiday Largo, but be sure to celebrate safely!

      • Largo

        Thanks, Carlos! I’m planning on celebrating with the one and only Squirrel Girl! ?

  • Roberto

    OMFG (can I say that here?). I don’t want to start my day writing a long screed about how godawful “No Time to Die” is. Let’s just say that as Columbo fares go, I would be hard-pressed to say which is my all-time least favorite. It is a two-horse race between “Last Salute to the Commodore” and “No Time to Die”. (As many will know there is another Ed McBain-based Columbo to come but it is not quite so bad.)

    I am sure the guys touch on this in their podcast, but this is NOT Columbo. There is a little guy who runs around in a crumpled raincoat that looks like our favorite Lieutenant, but I do not recognize him at all. This story sucks (can I say that here??), the writing is terrible, the acting is atrocious (I even came to hate the victim with her ridiculous acting and narrative), the crime and detection are laughable, there is no interaction between “Columbo” and the murderer (oh wait, was there even a murder???), and the bad guy gets blown away in the final scene.

    Those aspects, bad as they are, are enough to doom any show. But to put the “Columbo” name on this pile of garbage is a cruel joke. (Aren’t you glad that I didn’t want to write a long screed this morning?) Now that I got that off my chest, I look forward to hearing with Iain and Gerry have to say!

    • You can say that, no problem!

      There seems to be a consensus forming on the episode here…

  • CarlosMu

    I’m looking forward to this. I’ve watched this episode once, which is a record low for me. I think I’ll watch again and then listen to the podcast. Or maybe I should just listen to the podcast.

    • Largo

      I would just go ahead and listen to the podcast, Carlos. I’ve seen No Time To Die twice: once when it premiered and one more time when I got my Columbo DVD boxed set. I don’t plan on watching this one ever again, eh! Please proceed at your own risk on this one, Carlos! 😉

      • Ian Baxter

        Watched it earlier this week, when I told my son the name of the movie he thought it was a Bond film! We watched it anyway and I’ve since been reported for child cruelty! 🙂

        • Largo

          Oh, dear! The authorities have got to understand that you were simply doing your homework for this week’s podcast and your son just picked the wrong moment for his ‘quality time with dad.’ Hopefully Gerry can vouch for you on this one, Ian.

  • Ian Baxter

    The real crime here is that the opportunity was missed to make a solid Columbo episode with a great guest star. I’ve seen many a debate over the years about who would have made a challenging adversary for our hero. There are so many good possibilities that will sadly never happen, instead we get served this waste of talent and time. Seriously, would you rather watch this or Columbo taking on Peter Cushing (to name one of many who could have been great).

    If the idea is an attempt to see Columbo so completely out of ‘formula’ and watch how he adapts then you at least have to make it believable. He would not refer to his wife as Mrs Columbo with the other guests. This isn’t just a wedding he’s on the fringes of, he’s stepping in to the role of father of the groom. At the speech he’s introduced as Lt. Columbo!!! What? At least try to give us something of a fresh insight into this character if you’re going to set up such a family based scenario.

    As a fan there is absolutly nothing that satisfies in this dreadful offering, it stinks. No psychological battle of the wits, no murder, no murderer, no build up, no charm, no clever clues or insights, no background into criminal, no gotcha, no recognisable formula, not even the stupid dog (apologies to those who like the dog). They had already tried the change of formula with ‘Last Salute’ and failed, we did not need another attempt.

    Enjoyed the podcast, and hats off to Iain for trying to call it as you see it, you just happen to have got this one wrong 🙂 I’m off to calm down and make a list of all those great actors I wish had been invited to take on Columbo!

    • Roberto

      Great post, IanB.

      Despite “evidence” like in the opening of “No Time to Die”, I am still convinced (convinced, I tell ya) that there is no Mrs. Columbo. Columbo has made her up and uses an imaginary wife and her imagined relatives during his crime detections as needed. Columbo’s relatives don’t push him on this topic like you avoid certain subjects when talking to your crazy uncle who lives in the attic.

      • Ian Baxter

        Ha, why not go the whole hog… perhaps he’s not even a real cop! They just humour him and let him hang around. It would explain his random pocketing of evidence, jumping out of cars and reluctance to use a gun (which is a prop they just gave him) 🙂

        • Largo

          Just a friendly forum post for Ian and Roberto to consider here —

    • Largo

      I concur — superb forum post, Ian! My little furry friend, Bunny Bid, is also most impressed. Thank you especially for this most concise summation of “No Time To Die” :

      “As a fan there is absolutly nothing that satisfies in this dreadful offering, it stinks. No psychological battle of the wits, no murder, no murderer, no build up, no charm, no clever clues or insights, no background into criminal, no gotcha, no recognisable formula …”

      • Ian Baxter

        I’m curious Largo (or anyone else who cares to comment)… who would you have liked to have seen play a Columbo murderer?

        • Largo

          Well, since I’ve been watching my The Fugitive: The Most Wanted Edition DVD box set, I’d pick David Janssen and Barry Morse as two possible guest star murderers on Columbo. For some actresses, I would have liked to have seen Elizabeth Montgomery and Diana Rigg portray adversaries on the Columbo Mystery Movie series.

          • Ian Baxter

            I like it… I’ll throw Claude Rains and John Rhys-Davies into the mix.

        • Margaret Williams

          I would’ve liked to have seen Gena Rowlands and Kim Novak pitted against Lieutenant Columbo.

  • Roberto

    I just listened to the podcast and indeed we have a split vote. Gerry is the wise one this week with his well-aimed criticisms of “No Time to Die”. He mostly criticizes this dross as not holding up (to put it mildly) as a Columbo offering. There is virtually nothing in the movie that comes close to the typical Columbo fare we came to love and expect. I think there is no substitute for experiencing Columbo in real-time as it is hard to put in words how disappointed Columbo fans were with this movie when it first aired.

    Iain, on the other hand, seemed to genuinely enjoy watching this crap. Not only as a Columbo movie but as a movie in-and-of-itself. Having Columbo appear in it (you can’t really say that Columbo “starred” in the movie) was an added bonus to Iain since we get to see the Lieutenant out of his usual surroundings. I am not sure how much Iain is pulling our leg as he is wont to do. Maybe he is tweaking Gerry a bit knowing that this is a much-vilified Columbo movie among Columbo Philes.

    In any event, I am afraid that Iain must remain a probationary member of the Columbo fan club until word reaches the membership committee that he has changed his mind about “No Time to Die”. Also, the the committee remembers that Iain had at least a lukewarm reception to “Last Salute to the Commodore”, even praising it for trying new things!.

    All in all, a thoroughly enjoyable podcast with a healthy dose of laughter by all parties, including myself and the committee.

    • Glad you enjoyed the podcast despite my departure from received wisdom!

      • Margaret Williams

        “Received wisdom” — you’re so funny, Iain! Although it’s a bit surprising that you enjoyed ‘No Time to Die’ as much as you did, I’m cool with it. However, some of these other guys here on the forum need to take a chill pill concerning your own reaction to this particular Columbo episode. For me personally, I really don’t enjoy ‘No Time to Die’ because of the extremely high creep-out factor. Poor Melissa — what a horrible experience for her to go through! Thank God she wasn’t a murder victim!

  • Red Hobbes

    Here it is. The dregs.

    I applaud the notion of the producers to try and do something different from the tried and true Columbo formula, this was an ill advised attempt to put Columbo in an Ed McBain story. Yes, the story itself was fine as a movie of the week, but our favorite detective is a guest star in his own show. Columbo works as the lead detective trying to match wits with the culprit. This seemed more like a McMillian and Wife scenario, but with much less Nancy Walker, thank God.

    This was perhaps the worst episode I’ve ever seen of Columbo. However, if my memory serves, there is another lousy one coming.

    As far as dream opponents for Columbo, I’d love to see him match wits with Rock Hudson, George Peppard, Angela Lansbury, and Tom Selleck. That’d be a hoot to see Columbo trying to bust Jessica Fletcher or Thomas Magnum.

    Another great podcast fellows!

  • Ian Baxter

    The cassette the kidnapper gives to Melissa to listen to… that’s Columbo tuba music right?

    • Margaret Williams

      Oh, Ian — you just had to remind all of us here of that silly interlude! You think you’re awful funny, don’t you? Well, I say “boo” with an added “hiss” to your forum post. Whatcha think of them apples, mister?

      • Ian Baxter

        I think you’d have made a great Columbo adversary! 🙂

        • Margaret Williams

          I …. I …. I don’t really know how to respond to that, Ian. I feel that I lack a true killer instinct. So you think that I belong in a jail cell or something, Ian? :.(

          • Ian Baxter

            A compliment I assure you 🙂

          • Margaret Williams

            Okay. I still think of myself as just a Columbo sidekick. BTW, I’ve been studying criminology. I’d like to become an FBI Special Agent when I grow up, Ian! 🙂

  • My final thoughts on this show: It wasn’t a bad early 90s police procedural TV movie. By that I mean, if Peter Falk/Columbo had not been associated with it in any way, it wasn’t turn-it-off-before-it-sears-your-eyeballs-awful. It was, however, bland and completely forgettable. If I’d been channel surfing in 1992 and come across this (sans Falk/Columbo), I doubt I would’ve sat all the way through it without finding something else more entertaining to watch.

    The fact that it DOES contain both Falk and his Columbo character complicates things a bit.

    Because it does, I’d have probably stuck around to the end credits, back in 1992, solely because of Falk and the Columbo brand. But having these things would have then been (and is today) more a source of frustration than entertainment. It MAY have worked for me if the movie was a top notch police procedural thriller that took the Columbo character out of his usual element and put it to good use. But as it is, taking a beloved character out of its beloved formula and dropping it into a completely forgettable TV movie, with forgettable characters, performances and direction all around, well, there’s just no saving that for me.

    And there you have it.

    • Stop sitting on the fence and tell us how you really feel!!

    • Margaret Williams

      Awesome post, Mister Salty! These are my thoughts exactly! 🙂

    • Largo

      Oh, rapture! You got to chat with a princess, uh — I mean an angel ….. D’oh! I mean — you got to chat with the most exquisite Joanna Going and she responded so sweetly! I’m beyond ecstatic here and ….. okay, I’ll stop now …. **SWOON**

    • Roberto

      Thanks again for reaching out to Columbo stars who are still with us. Joanna is fantastic and I am glad that she is still active (I realize that she is not old by any means) and responded.

  • Largo

    My apologies for going off topic here:
    I mentioned earlier that I’ve been watching The Fugitive (1963-67) television series, courtesy of The Fugitive: The Most Wanted Edition DVD box set that I received as a Christmas gift. Well, due to several recent “marathon” viewing sessions, I’m hearing the incidental music for The Fugitive, by Peter Rugolo, within my brain all too frequently during my waking hours. My various ordinary and mundane tasks (especially at work) that I perform throughout the day are now heightened to rather ridiculous melodramatic proportions because of this incessant Rugolo score running constantly inside of my head. Don’t you guys hate when this happens? Guys …….. ???? ?

  • Largo

    Well, after having a fun time at #ColumboTV on Twitter (where we all watched “Fade In To Murder” together as one, big, happy ‘Tweeting Family’), it’s high time that I got started on my Columbo Podcast homework for the next couple of weeks. So tonight, on my Macintosh computer, I will be watching a Columbo Mystery Movie double-feature: “A Bird In The Hand” and “It’s All In The Game.” In short, Saturday night’s alright for fighting viewing the Columbo series, eh! ?

    • Ian Baxter

      Only nine episodes left!!! Yes, enjoyed the #ColumboTV last night, anyone wants to join in can find details at http://livetweeting.org/hashtags/columbotv/#previousevents

      • Largo

        There may be only nine episodes left for the CPT, but each and every one of us can do this live tweeting to Columbo Mystery Movies until the cows come home, bro! ?

        • Ian Baxter

          Exactly!

        • Roberto

          Oh, lest we forget. Only nine Columbo episodes left for CPT but then they are going to dive straight away into a Star Trek podcast series (where Gerry and Iain’s roles will be reversed). Or was it a Lovejoy podcast they will be starting?

          All kidding aside, Iain and Gerry are fantastic podcasters. The best I have ever heard on any subject. So I hope they do carry on podcasting in some manner after our favorite Lieutenant rides into the proverbial sunset.

          • Largo

            “Iain and Gerry are fantastic podcasters. The best I have ever heard on any subject.”

            Right you are, Roberto! I’m hoping for a Star Trek (1966-69) podcast. But I do believe that Gerry and Iain are leaning toward a Murder One podcast in the very near future. All in all, I’d much prefer a Star Trek podcast. I want it to be “Star Trek Lives!” in the podcast universe, but with Scottish accents, eh! ?

          • Ian Baxter

            I’ve just bought the ‘Monk’ box set, wonder if that could be in the mix?

          • Largo

            Wait a minute! You mean to tell me that you still haven’t bought yourself The Wild Wild West: The Complete TV Series DVD box set yet? ?

          • Ian Baxter

            🙂 Nope

          • Largo

            ***SNIFFLE*** ????

          • Well that is quite the compliment Roberto, thanks.

            We have been pondering what we are going to do post Columbo but no decision has been made yet. I (Gerry) quite like the idea of ‘Jonathan Creek’ as for me it always felt like a show with similarities to Columbo. It also has the added benefit of not requiring several years of weekly commitment that other shows would (sorry Ian but that rules Monk out – a show that I do love.)

            Anyway, you guys will be the first to know. We will no doubt do something, although a little break will be nice.

          • Well, a Jonathan Creek podcast would thrill my wife and I, we’re both big fans, and having such quality material being discussed by the two of you would be sublime. So, a hearty “hope it happens” from the two of us….

          • Largo

            Jonathan Creek? I’ve never heard of this series before. But after a quick ‘Google’ search, I’m now intrigued. However, doing some further research I see that the reaction to Series 5 is quite lackluster. So for now, I’m planning on purchasing the “Complete Series 1-4” DVD set. Gerry, what’s your own opinion concerning this Series 5?

          • Not sure about Gerry, but my opinion is that there are – not unlike Columbo – fewer great episodes towards the end.

  • Wow – this one has certainly got everyone hot under the collar. For my part, I really enjoyed it. In fact, the tension was quite nicely built up. Yes – I agree that it’s markedly different in format, but for me that was part of the enjoyment. I can see how it would offend the traditionalists – and certainly there was no cat and mouse interplay between Columbo and the villain – but when you put that to one side and view it on its own merit, it actually holds up pretty well compared to a lot of stuff out there. As far as Frank himself was concerned, there were some revelations: we saw his influencing skills played to the fore, even managing to persuade his captain to do as he wanted – in fact, for once, he seemed to be the one absolutely calling the shots. We also got to see what a great dancer he was. We got to see some interplay with his family.

    To compare this to ‘Last Salute’ is just ridiculous in my view, and if anyone seriously believes that, I suggest that they should watch ‘Last Salute’ again right now! The acid test for me is, could I watch this episode again? Absolutely! Could I say that about ‘Last Salute’? Absolutely not!

    I now look forward to hearing the podcast.

    • Largo

      Now wait just a dog gone minute, Kieran! Iain prepared you before you posted, right? 😉

      • Yes. In fact I admit it – we’re next door neighbours.

        Joking aside, no; however I’m now intrigued to hear the podcast so will do so within the next 24 hours.

        • Largo

          Well — it’s been more than 24 hours now, Kieran. Ya all done a listening to that there No Time To Die podcast yet? If’n so, whatcha all think of it, eh? 🙂

          • Sure am. In fact, I’m onto the previous week’s now by way of a catch-up. I thought this week’s podcast was excellent and was guilty, once again, of some major belly laughs as I was walking the dog at around 6:30am yesterday and today [my walk lasts for around 50 minutes so the podcast was split between yesterday and today]. Absolutely top-drawer podcast in terms of humour and I’m with Iain in giving this 7 out of 10. Some very interesting insight provided as well, so all in all, I had a big smile on my face throughout both walks. There is something so endearing about both Iain and Gerry, especially when they get into a fit of the giggles. Certainly a good dose of Celtic humour (with apologies to any Rangers fans out there).

          • Largo

            “There is something so endearing about both Iain and Gerry, especially when they get into a fit of the giggles.”

            So true, so true! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I love these guys!** This podcast provided me with some huge belly laughs, too, and so it’s definitely tops in my book as well, Kieran.

            ** But not in a strange way, dudes. Just sayin’, eh. 🙂

  • Tim S. Turner

    Words cannot express my loathing of this episode. I actually get so angry thinking about it that I break out into shakes and tics. This. Is. NOT. A. Columbo. Episode.